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    Movie Times | Movie Reviews | Theater Reviews
Citizens Continue to Protest Berkshire Museum Art Sale
By Andy McKeever, iBerkshires Staff
02:47PM / Saturday, September 09, 2017
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Hope Davis was one of four who spoke at Park Square in protest of the planned sale. PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Sharon Gregory has reviewed more than a decade of the Berkshire Museum's financials and says the situation isn't nearly as dire as the non-profit organization says.   And Gregory isn't just anybody, she is someone with 40 years of financial experience. She retired as the vice president of business development and planning for Iredale Mineral Cosmetics, and before that worked with a number of organizations such as Lehman Brothers and Citibank.   "I think the deficit has a lot to do with managerial decisions on where they spend the money and where they

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'Tulip Fever': When Speculation Was in Bloom
By Michael S. Goldberger, iBerkshires film critic
06:24PM / Friday, September 08, 2017
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A fascinating backdrop for an intricate if not convoluted, seriocomic love story that could have very well been written by Nöel Coward gives director Justin Chadwick's "Tulip Fever" an arthouse cachet. But while patience is a virtue, the esoteric appeal of this costumed affair set in 17th-century Holland may require more virtue than the general moviegoer wishes to expend. All the same, for those unfamiliar with the financial frenzy that speculation in tulip bulbs created during the era in question, its intrigue deserves a study even if you pass on seeing the film.   Viewed in a greater, historical perspective, not unlike the frantic rush by everyday Americans to play

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Cultural Council Announces 'EBT Card to Culture'
04:35PM / Saturday, September 02, 2017
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STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. — The state's "EBT Card to Culture" will offer low-income families access to more than 100 nonprofit arts, history, and science venues across the state through free or discounted admission.    State officials and cultural leaders formally launched the new program on Wednesday at the Norman Rockwell Museum, which offers free admission to cardholders. Supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Baker-Polito administration, the EBT Card to Culture is considered the most comprehensive effort of its kind in the nation to open doors to arts and cultural experiences for low-income families.   "In our new strategic plan, the

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World-Class Architect Climbs Aboard Model Railroad Museum
By Tammy Daniels, iBerkshires Staff
08:36PM / Friday, September 01, 2017
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Award-winning architect Frank Gehry addresses the crowd at Friday's event. The 88-year-old Gehry will design the model railroad museum. NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Officials with the proposed model railroad museum are confident that they will have the funding in hand next year to move forward on the $65 million project.    The Extreme Model Railroad and Contemporary Architecture Museum has so far raised $2.5 million from private contributions and state grants; it expects to reach 50 percent of its goal by January with the balance by June 2018. The principals, including former Guggenhaim director Thomas Krens and former Govs. William Weld and Michael Dukakis, believe the

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'Wind River': Opens the Floodgates of Indignation
By Michael S. Goldberger, iBerkshires film critic
02:09PM / Thursday, August 31, 2017
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Writer-director Taylor Sheridan's "Wind River," a murder-mystery inspired by true events, deserves plaudits not only because it is a skilled piece of filmmaking, but also owing to its eye-opening exposé of the disgraceful socioeconomic conditions on Native American reservations.   While the majority of Americans are more or less cognizant of the poverty that wreaks havoc in our urban ghettos, far fewer citizens are familiar with this rural brand of destitution ostensibly swept under the carpet of our national conscience. See it up close and the mind boggles.   Be warned, this is tough viewing. In service to its ugly divulgences, there are few punches pulled.

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5 Unique Pizzas You Need to Try Today!
10:30AM / Wednesday, August 30, 2017
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True pizza lovers like to change up our beloved pie into all kinds of different combinations. We have been unable to live life by pepperoni alone, even though we a lot of us are die-hard pepperoni fans. More than anything, I think we are guilty of just loving all the cheesy combinations a good pizza can provide.

The best thing about pizza, aside from automatically putting us in a better mood, is that there are endless ways to enjoy it. There is a saying that goes We totally agree!

If you're looking to try a new slice of pie, here are five unique pizzas made in the Berkshires that you'll totally want to order this weekend.

 

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North Adams Earns Cultural District Designation
By Tammy Daniels, iBerkshires Staff
02:21AM / Wednesday, August 30, 2017
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The MCC board of directors held its August meeting at Mass MoCA, where it voted on North Adams' application for cultural district. NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — The Massachusetts Cultural Commission on Tuesday added two new cultural districts to the state's creative economy map: North Adams and Arlington.   The two districts bring the number of cultural districts across the state to 43.    "We've had North Adams in our sights for quite a long time," said MCC Executive Director Anita Walker. "It was one of the communities we sort of imagined when we started the program that could be a cultural district."   But Pittsfield was first on

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Williamstown Artist Creates Replica of Roman Sculpture Panel
By Rebecca Dravis, iBerkshires Staff
03:54AM / Tuesday, August 29, 2017
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WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Technology from the 21st century has brought a piece of artwork from the first century back to life.

Using a CNC (Computer Numeric Control) machine, Williamstown artist Lindsay Neathawk recently completed a replica of the "Spoils" panel of the Arch of Titus. The arch is located in Rome and was constructed around the year 82 by the Emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus, to commemorate Titus' victories, including the Siege of Jerusalem in the year 70.

The "Spoils" panel is on the south side of the arch and depicts Roman soldiers carrying items taken from the Jerusalem Temple, including the temple menorah,

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'The Only Living Boy in New York': What This World Needs Now
By Michael S. Goldberger, iBerkshires film critic
03:50PM / Thursday, August 24, 2017
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Call me a hopeless romantic. It's my excuse for liking and recommending to kindred spirits director Marc Webb's decidedly imperfect, melodramatic and oft soap-operatic "The Only Living Boy in New York."    My justification is in service to the rather dire straits in which our nation currently finds itself. Quite plainly, to coin a phrase, what this world needs now is love, sweet love. And while this coming-of-age tale doesn't completely fill said need, it does supply that second-best commodity: sappiness.    It's sophisticated sappiness, but sappiness all the same.   In cosmopolitan Manhattan, Thomas Webb, the twenty-something son of elite,

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Tanglewood Wraps Up Classical Season; Shanghai String Quartet at Music Mountain
By Stephen Dankner, Special to iBerkshires
04:46PM / Wednesday, August 23, 2017
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Tanglewood's classical programming winds up this week to make way for a series of popular artists, such as Diana Ross and Sting.

This week, Tanglewood concludes its 2017 classical programming, culminating with the always-anticipated traditional final concert, on Sunday, Aug. 27, featuring Beethoven's glorious and triumphant Ninth Symphony, preceded by Charles Ives' "The Housatonic at Stockbridge," from his three-movement orchestral suite, ‘Three Places in New England' – a magical, transformative and inspiring hymn to nature.

Before the Ninth, and the "Popular Artists Series," there are three exceptional programs you should consider

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